Kagan Tumer's Publications

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A Survey of Collectives. K. Tumer and D. Wolpert. In K. Tumer and D. Wolpert, editors, Collectives and the Design of Complex Systems, pp. 1–42, Springer, 2004.

Abstract

Due to the increasing sophistication and miniaturization of computational components, complex, distributed systems of interacting agents are becoming ubiquitous. Such systems, where each agent aims to optimize its own performance, but where there is a well-defined set of system-level performance criteria, are called collectives. The fundamental problem in analyzing/designing such systems is in determining how the combined actions of a large number of agents leads to "coordinated" behavior on the global scale. Examples of artificial systems which exhibit such behavior include packet routing across a data network, control of an array of communication satellites, coordination of multiple rovers, and dynamic job scheduling across a distributed computer grid. Examples of natural systems include ecosystems, economies, and the organelles within a living cell.

No current scientific discipline provides a thorough understanding of the relation between the structure of collectives and how well they meet their overall performance criteria. Although still very young, research on collectives has resulted in successes both in understanding and designing such systems. It is expected that as it matures and draws upon other disciplines related to collectives, this field will greatly expand the range of computationally addressable tasks. Moreover, in addition to drawing on them, such a fully developed field of collective intelligence may provide insight into already established scientific fields, such as mechanism design, economics, game theory, and population biology. This chapter provides a survey to the emerging science of collectives. (includes over 200 references.)

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BibTeX Entry

@incollection{tumer-wolpert_cdcs04,
	title = {A Survey of Collectives}, 
	author = {K. Tumer and D. Wolpert},
	booktitle = {Collectives and the Design of Complex Systems},
	editor = {K. Tumer and D. Wolpert},
	pages = {1-42},
	publisher = {Springer},
	abstract ={Due to the increasing sophistication and miniaturization of computational components, complex, distributed systems of interacting agents are becoming ubiquitous.  Such systems, where each agent aims to optimize its own performance, but where there is a well-defined set of system-level performance criteria, are called <b> collectives</b>.  The fundamental problem in analyzing/designing such systems is in determining how the combined actions of a large number of agents leads to "coordinated" behavior on the global scale.  Examples of artificial systems which exhibit such behavior include packet routing across a data network, control of an array of communication satellites, coordination of multiple rovers, and dynamic job scheduling across a distributed computer grid.  Examples of natural systems include ecosystems, economies, and the organelles within a living cell.
<p> No current scientific discipline provides a thorough understanding of the relation between the structure of collectives and how well they meet their overall performance criteria.  Although still very young, research on collectives has resulted in successes both in understanding and designing such systems.  It is expected that as it matures and draws upon other disciplines related to collectives, this field will greatly expand the range of computationally addressable tasks.  Moreover, in addition to drawing on them, such a fully developed field of collective intelligence may provide insight into already established scientific fields, such as mechanism design, economics, game theory, and population biology.  This chapter provides a survey to the emerging science of collectives.  (includes over 200 references.)},
	bib2html_pubtype = {Book Chapters},
	bib2html_rescat = {Collectives, Multiagent Systems, Economics/Game Theory},
	year = {2004}
}

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