Labram
Research
Group
Labram
Research
Group
Labram
Research
Group
Labram
Research
Group
Labram
Research
Group
Labram
Research
Group

Disordered
Semioconductors

We study semiconductors grown by low-cost techniques such as solution-deposition. These systems typically lack the long-range order present in traditional crystalline semiconductors such a silicon, leading to distinct electronic properties.

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Flexible
Electronics

We aim to develop electronic devices and circuits compatible with large-area, flexible substrates. These low-cost, light-weight device are anticipated to revolutionize the commercial electronics market; enabling a range of previously inconceivable products.

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Low-Cost
Solar Cells

By developing low-cost solar cell technologies we hope to one day produce a source of renewable energy that is competitive in a subsidy-free environment. This strategy is intended to overcome problems with attempts to mitigate climate change solely via political means.

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New Semiconducting Materials

We work with synthetic chemists to identify, screen and characterise new semiconducting materials for flexible, low-cost electronics and solar applications.

Thin-Film Electronic Devices

We develop and study a range of novel, high-performance, thin-film electronic devices by employing low-cost / solution-based semiconductor growth methods.

Charge-Transport Studies

We employ various device and contactless characterization techniques to investigate the nature of charge-transport in disordered semiconductors.

Semiconductor and Device Modeling

We develop mathematical models to describe and predict the charge-transport properties of disordered materials and thin-film devices, and compare with experimental data.
Welcome!

Labram Research Group at Oregon State University

In the Labram Research we combine experimental and theoretical techniques to study the electronic properties of disordered semiconductors for next-generation flexible electronics and solar-cell applications. The semiconductors studied in the Labram Group are compatible with low-cost, large-area growth techniques such as solution-deposition, enabling a range of novel new commercial device applications.


We use experimental techniques such as electronic device measurements, contactless microwave characterization, and a range of structural analysis techniques, to generate knowledge on various physical phenomena and on the nature of charge-transport in this class of materials. This information is designed to inform with regards to material design rules and with protocols for future device development and optimization.


More detailed information about our research activates is available on our research page.

Latest News

John Labram joins Oregon State University